Janelle Bio.gif

Hi.

Because I want to run for the rest of my life, and I’m still learning how.

Trust the process

Trust the process

How a lot of work and a little patience eventually pays off in the injury comeback.

My physical therapist was so over me asking “when will I see a difference in my gait?” So I stopped asking and instead put my head down and continued to grind. And it paid off BIG TIME. There is still some work to be done, but I’m super happy with the progress.

I’ve been going to physical therapy since February. Yes, seriously, I’ve gone for over 30 sessions. (Insert money flying emoji here) But it’s so worth it. When I first started running again in March, she put me on the dreadmill and said one word, “run.” So I did, and she pulled out her tablet and videoed me from all angles. Some of the things she told me I already knew, but what I didn’t know was how severe my hip instability was. Every time I planted my leg, the opposite hip dropped significantly, which was evidence of a weak gluteus medius on both sides. There were other things I needed to work on as well: increasing hip extension and lessening my displacement from the ground, but those two things I could focus and actually work on every single run. Strengthening my glute med and therefore stabilizing my pelvis was something that I had to have patience and wait to see the difference.

Pelvic stability before and after

This week it happened. The photo on the left is from a race last year, and the photo on the right is from a run a few days ago. On the left notice the significant drop in my right hip while my left foot is planted. On the right, you can see how stabile my pelvis is while landing and nearly parallel with the ground. PROGRESS!

This took months. Literally months of side planks, side lying leg lifts, lateral band walks, and hip hikes. And patience. Trust the process. It works.

How to survive a running injury

How to survive a running injury

Out of the woods

Out of the woods